East Java

Province Summary​

Capital City

Surabaya

Key industries

Manufacture, Agriculture


Market

Supply (-)

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0

Heads

Import (-)
Cattle

0

Heads

Export (-)
Cattle

0

Heads

Market (-)
Size

0

Tons

ESCAS Feedlot in
The Province (-)

0

Feedlot

ESCAS Abattoir in
The Province (-)

0

Abattoirs

Land Utilization (Ha)

Port Infrastructure

Port for Cattle

-

Sea Toll Route

Unavailable

Loading Unloading Time (Days)

Regulation and Incentives

-

Feed

Feed Production

Support Systems


Breeding

Cattle
Import

Breeding


Fattening

Fattening


Trading

Cattle
Collector

Interprovince
Trader

External
Market


Processing

Abattoir

Processing


Strong sectors

Weak sectors


Province Overview

  • East Java plays a central role in driving the economy of the eastern part of Indonesia. The region acts as the gateway for trade between Indonesia's western and eastern regions (i.e. goods are commonly transported from East Java to the eastern parts of Indonesia) as well as international trading.
  • Domestic Investment Realization in East Java reached USD 3.98 Billion while the Foreign Investment Realization reached USD 1.58 Billion in 2020. 
  • East Java has international air and sea ports that routinely handles inbound and outbound cattle activity.
  • East Java has the highest population of cattle in Indonesia, accounting for 28% of the national cattle population, while also being a province with a high consumption of beef and a well-established cattle value chain.
  • East Java is also the supplier to the cattle market outside East Java and other provinces outside Java island. Also, East Java has little cattle import from other provinces in the Java island.
  • East Java's GDP recorded 8.8% CAGR positive growth rate (2014-2019), above the national GDP growth which was 8.2% over the same time period, with the manufacturing sector becoming the highest contributor to the provincial GDP.

Real-time update on Beef Prices in each Province​

SIMPONI-Ternak is a digital tool developed by Indonesia’s Ministry of Agriculture in response to the high need for market information, covering real-time prices for multiple agricultural commodities in each province. For real-time beef prices in each province, please click the button on the right.


Provincial Macro-data

East Java GDRP (billion USD)

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East Java population (thousand)

East Java minimum wage (USD)

East Java cattle population (head)

Investment Considerations




Stories from the Field

Success Story

  • Mutually beneficial collaboration between commercial company and smallholder farmers

    PT Santori provided empowerment in terms of financial support and business assurance for smallholder cattle breeding farmers who can also sell their ready-to-grow cattle through PT Santori as an integrated cattle farming company.

    Read more

Lesson Learned

  • The importance of livestock health monitoring and vaccination

    East Java still experiences high Brucellosis cases that caused cattle infertility and miscarriages. This can be prevented through vaccination and periodical blood sample analysis but it is still minimally rolled out in East Java.

    Read more

Existing business model


Number of Commercial Feedlot

5

Number of Commercial Breedlot

1

Number of Smallholder

1,848,888

East Java has the highest number of smallholders in Indonesia. Despite the limited land availability, the province still manages to achieve a high beef and cattle production capability by widely implementing the Cut and Carry model. The government also provides support through artificial insemination programs.

Definitions

  1. Commercial feedlots are legal business entities with the purpose of increasing the weight of cattle (BPS, Large and Small Livestock Establishment Statistics 2020)
  2. Commercial breedlots are legal business entities that focus on raising livestock to breed and produce new, young livestock with inherited traits (BPS, Large and Small Livestock Establishment Statistics 2020)
  3. Smallholders are small-scale cattle businesses, usually family owned, with varying cattle number per household. The average smallholder farmers' ownership in Indonesia is about 2 to 5 cattle per household, but it can reach 20 to 50 cattle per household in regions which cattle farming are a main source of livelihood, such as NTB and NTT (BPS STU 2014)


Below are the existing business model​

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